7 hours ago · 18 notes · Reblogged from fuckyeahchinesemyths

Theme Vocabulary: Pronouns

zenmezhongwen:

(wǒ) I, me

您,你 (nín, nǐ) You (formal), you (informal)

他, 她 (tā) he, she

我们 (wǒmen) we

你们 (nǐmen) you (plural)

他们, 她们 (tāmen) they (generally), they (if only females)

(zhè) this

(nà) that

这些 (zhèxiē) these

那些 (nàxiē) those

一些 (yīxiē) some (things)

有的 (yǒude) some (people)

所有 (suǒyǒu) all (people)

大家 (dàjiā) Everyone

so totally useful for all those learning Mandarin!

1 day ago · 236 notes · Reblogged from zenmezhongwen

shelzie:

trying to be better at keeping up with girlsdrawingirls' weekly themes! this past week's was 'peaches', and my first thought was longevity peaches naturally, so here's something inspired by that.

I am totally loving the style.

shelzie:

trying to be better at keeping up with girlsdrawingirls' weekly themes! this past week's was 'peaches', and my first thought was longevity peaches naturally, so here's something inspired by that.

I am totally loving the style.

2 days ago · 51 notes · Reblogged from shelzie

fuckyeahchinesemyths:

Kay, so this picture looks really freaky, but not to worry.They look this way ‘cause they’re supposed to scare all them evil spirits, so if you’re not one, and chances are, you aren’t, they won’t try to catch you.
You can tell they’re black and white - like, duh! So they’re called the Black and White Guard of Impermanence. Cool, right? 
But waaaaaitaminute, if they’re guards, and Cowhead and Horseface are also guards, who do we see when we get to hell?
Eh, it depends if you’re Taoist or Buddhist. These two here are Taoist, and Cowhead and Horseface are Buddhist, so go figure. The Chinese people actually disagree with how hell looks like, [see previous post about hell] so they made up deities according to their system of beliefs.
Cool, huh?
On the Black Guard’s hat, it’s supposed to say, “Death to those who meet me,” and on the White Guard’s hat, it’s supposed to say, “Fortune comes to those who greet me,” so they’re basically in charge of catching bad souls and good souls respectively. 
Anyway, there is, as usual, a story surrounding these two guards:
The Black Guard and White Guard were actually two policemen in Ancient China. So they had to transfer a prisoner, but on the way they lost him and were all like, shit, goddammit. So like, they split up, and agreed to wait for each other under the bridge. The Black Guard waited and waited, but the White Guard didn’t show up, and so the river was flooded and he drowned. The White Guard came, realized what had happened, and was so depressed he hung himself.
Then, they were like, presented to the Jade Emperor, and he was mighty impressed with them so he was all like, “Kay guys, I totally have to make you Guards in the Underworld, and you’ll fetch human souls for me.”By the way, when they were mortals, the White Guard’s name was “謝必安”, or Xie Bi An, which means thanking the gods for one’s safety, and the Black Guard’s name was “范無救," which means having sinned till there’s no hope of salvation.
They are also called many other names too, like Great Elder (White Guard) and Second Great Elder (Black Guard), as well as 7th Master (White Guard) and 8th Master (Black Guard). 
Pretty badass, don’tcha think?

fuckyeahchinesemyths:

Kay, so this picture looks really freaky, but not to worry.They look this way ‘cause they’re supposed to scare all them evil spirits, so if you’re not one, and chances are, you aren’t, they won’t try to catch you.

You can tell they’re black and white - like, duh! So they’re called the Black and White Guard of Impermanence. Cool, right? 

But waaaaaitaminute, if they’re guards, and Cowhead and Horseface are also guards, who do we see when we get to hell?

Eh, it depends if you’re Taoist or Buddhist. These two here are Taoist, and Cowhead and Horseface are Buddhist, so go figure. The Chinese people actually disagree with how hell looks like, [see previous post about hell] so they made up deities according to their system of beliefs.

Cool, huh?

On the Black Guard’s hat, it’s supposed to say, “Death to those who meet me,” and on the White Guard’s hat, it’s supposed to say, “Fortune comes to those who greet me,” so they’re basically in charge of catching bad souls and good souls respectively. 

Anyway, there is, as usual, a story surrounding these two guards:

The Black Guard and White Guard were actually two policemen in Ancient China. So they had to transfer a prisoner, but on the way they lost him and were all like, shit, goddammit. So like, they split up, and agreed to wait for each other under the bridge. The Black Guard waited and waited, but the White Guard didn’t show up, and so the river was flooded and he drowned. The White Guard came, realized what had happened, and was so depressed he hung himself.

Then, they were like, presented to the Jade Emperor, and he was mighty impressed with them so he was all like, “Kay guys, I totally have to make you Guards in the Underworld, and you’ll fetch human souls for me.”

By the way, when they were mortals, the White Guard’s name was “謝必安”, or Xie Bi An, which means thanking the gods for one’s safety, and the Black Guard’s name was “范無救," which means having sinned till there’s no hope of salvation.

They are also called many other names too, like Great Elder (White Guard) and Second Great Elder (Black Guard), as well as 7th Master (White Guard) and 8th Master (Black Guard). 

Pretty badass, don’tcha think?

5 days ago · 52 notes · Reblogged from fuckyeahchinesemyths

fuckyeahchinesemyths:


What we have here is the two of the most bad-ass guards of the Netherworld. If you think Cerberus made you pee your pants, you sure ain’t seen nothin’ yet, not even these two. They’re Cowhead and Horseface, [牛头马面 niu tou ma mian] and they’re scary as hell (haha), as seen in this verse:
“The Bull-head demonsThe Horse-face demonsWith iron spikes and bronze gavels,They strike till faces contort and blood flows down;" 
[Admittedly, I don’t think demons should be in the plural form because they’re the only ones with this kind of funky appearance.]
Like all guards, they have the required armour, weapons and all that jazz, but did you know they also brought souls down to the Underworld? Bet you didn’t see that coming. I don’t know how they can guard this place and bring back souls, but hey - being a god means you’re like, everywhere 24/7 and on call all the time.
And why not? You see, Cowhead and Horseface used to be, well, a cow and a horse who worked tilling the land. When they died, King Yama was real impressed with them, and he needed hard workers to run hell smoothly, so he was all, “All right, Imma make you the guards of hell, yo,” and he gave them a human appearance.
So like, they should have ruled hell this way forever right? Wrong!
Too bad Cowhead and Horseface dealt with humans all the damn time and had to listen to their complaints, and the dead could talk your ear right off. The worst part of the job was being on earth all the damn time because mortals could track you down and beg you not to take them or their relatives or whatever, which was what happened. 
See, there was this Squire called Ma, and he had like a shit ton of concubines but only one son. And you know we Chinese people like male heirs, and he really wanted to throw a huge-ass birthday party for his son so he went to see a fortune teller. 
So then like, he went to the fortune teller to ask for his son’s fortune, and the prophet was all, “Dude, your son is supposed to die on his eighteenth birthday!”
The Squire nearly went batshit insane.
But the prophet was all, “Dude, chill. All you gotta do is to bring food to this secret location and beg for your son’s life, and all will be good, man.”
So the Squire was like, kay, and he walked all the way to see Cowhead and Horseface, climbing up the steps up to this temple to get to them.
When he got there, these two people were like, playing chess, so he brought the food down and said, “Hi, it’s not like I need your help or anything, but here’s something for you to eat.” Cowhead and Horseface were all like, “Cool! Thanks!” and started eating.
But they knew - like, duh! - that this man wanted something, so they asked the Squire what he wanted and the Squire was all, “Well, don’t take my son please. He’s gonna turn 18 this year and he’s my only heir,” all that jazz.
Then Cowhead and Horseface were like, “No way, man! Rules are rules and besides, King Yama would like, totally punish us. I mean, you can’t like, twist the rules of hell you know.”
But the Squire pleaded like mad, getting on his knees and all, so they were like, “Kay, whatever. We kind of needed more time to finish the chess game anyways,” and didn’t go grab the soul of the Squire’s son.
Yay for the Squire, but there was trouble for these two.
See, King Yama found out, and he got so mad that he changed their faces back to their animal form, and they became these freakish half-human, half-animal beings that you see all the time.
It ain’t that bad, though - I’m sure they scare the shit out of all those evil spirits - that is, if evil spirits still had shit to be scared out of.
And that’s my cool story, bro.
Also, the quote is from this website and you can check out some more badass depictions of them over there as well.

fuckyeahchinesemyths:

What we have here is the two of the most bad-ass guards of the Netherworld. If you think Cerberus made you pee your pants, you sure ain’t seen nothin’ yet, not even these two. They’re Cowhead and Horseface, [牛头马面 niu tou ma mian] and they’re scary as hell (haha), as seen in this verse:

The Bull-head demons
The Horse-face demons
With iron spikes and bronze gavels,
They strike till faces contort and blood flows down;

[Admittedly, I don’t think demons should be in the plural form because they’re the only ones with this kind of funky appearance.]

Like all guards, they have the required armour, weapons and all that jazz, but did you know they also brought souls down to the Underworld? Bet you didn’t see that coming. I don’t know how they can guard this place and bring back souls, but hey - being a god means you’re like, everywhere 24/7 and on call all the time.

And why not? You see, Cowhead and Horseface used to be, well, a cow and a horse who worked tilling the land. When they died, King Yama was real impressed with them, and he needed hard workers to run hell smoothly, so he was all, “All right, Imma make you the guards of hell, yo,” and he gave them a human appearance.

So like, they should have ruled hell this way forever right? Wrong!

Too bad Cowhead and Horseface dealt with humans all the damn time and had to listen to their complaints, and the dead could talk your ear right off. The worst part of the job was being on earth all the damn time because mortals could track you down and beg you not to take them or their relatives or whatever, which was what happened. 

See, there was this Squire called Ma, and he had like a shit ton of concubines but only one son. And you know we Chinese people like male heirs, and he really wanted to throw a huge-ass birthday party for his son so he went to see a fortune teller. 

So then like, he went to the fortune teller to ask for his son’s fortune, and the prophet was all, “Dude, your son is supposed to die on his eighteenth birthday!”

The Squire nearly went batshit insane.

But the prophet was all, “Dude, chill. All you gotta do is to bring food to this secret location and beg for your son’s life, and all will be good, man.”

So the Squire was like, kay, and he walked all the way to see Cowhead and Horseface, climbing up the steps up to this temple to get to them.

When he got there, these two people were like, playing chess, so he brought the food down and said, “Hi, it’s not like I need your help or anything, but here’s something for you to eat.” Cowhead and Horseface were all like, “Cool! Thanks!” and started eating.

But they knew - like, duh! - that this man wanted something, so they asked the Squire what he wanted and the Squire was all, “Well, don’t take my son please. He’s gonna turn 18 this year and he’s my only heir,” all that jazz.

Then Cowhead and Horseface were like, “No way, man! Rules are rules and besides, King Yama would like, totally punish us. I mean, you can’t like, twist the rules of hell you know.”

But the Squire pleaded like mad, getting on his knees and all, so they were like, “Kay, whatever. We kind of needed more time to finish the chess game anyways,” and didn’t go grab the soul of the Squire’s son.

Yay for the Squire, but there was trouble for these two.

See, King Yama found out, and he got so mad that he changed their faces back to their animal form, and they became these freakish half-human, half-animal beings that you see all the time.

It ain’t that bad, though - I’m sure they scare the shit out of all those evil spirits - that is, if evil spirits still had shit to be scared out of.

And that’s my cool story, bro.

Also, the quote is from this website and you can check out some more badass depictions of them over there as well.

6 days ago · 122 notes · Reblogged from fuckyeahchinesemyths

fuckyeahchinesemyths:

It was real hard searching for a decent image of this guy, but man, you really gotta give him his props. I mean, day in and out, [though of course he don’t give no shit ‘bout day and night,] King Yama sits in hell and looks through the queue of human souls who have just come in and sorts them out. It takes forever, but then again, he’s got all the time in the world to do it. 
So the spirits, Cowhead and Horseface, [more about them next week!] bring in the souls for judgment, and King Yama opens the book of Life and Death [now you know where the Japanese got the idea of Deathnote] and sentences the dude/chick/human to whichever part of hell depending on how badly he’s sinned.
Some people say hell has ten courts with ten kings presiding over each one, but to the others, there are eighteen levels - whew! We don’t really know fo sho’. Anyway, no one really knows how hell is like - people just like making guesses and scaring themselves. Plus, it kind of gives us a kick in the butt to be good.
I mean, hell is really, well, hell! The demons in each court of hell torture you, like piercing your ribs, gouging your eyes out, making you kneel on various sharp objects, cutting your tongue, and so on. And you thought your teachers were sadists. But after you’ve suffered for long enough, you get to the wheel of reincarnation, where you will begin another life. You also gotta drink the wine/soup of Meng Po, [who is this old lady] to forget everything in your previous life. It also makes starting over a lot easier.
At least it’s more sanitary than the river Lethe.
So if you were a good human being, guess what? You get to be human again! Or if you were bad, you get turned into some pest like a fly or cockroach. Gross. That’s even more incentive to be good, I say.
Anyway, though the illustration makes Yama Chinese, he was actually Indian - he’s a Buddhist concept, see, and his likeness was translated for the Chinese people to make him a lot more accessible. I mean, we do create gods in our own image too, you know. Some people say that King Yama was the first man who died, and so he got to preside over the realm of the dead, but who knows?
His name also comes from Sanskrit, which means, “trussing up.” I sure don’t want to be trussed up by him, and neither do you.
Don’t be scared of him, though! He’s really cool - I mean, without him, all hell would break loose.
See what I did there?

fuckyeahchinesemyths:

It was real hard searching for a decent image of this guy, but man, you really gotta give him his props. I mean, day in and out, [though of course he don’t give no shit ‘bout day and night,] King Yama sits in hell and looks through the queue of human souls who have just come in and sorts them out. It takes forever, but then again, he’s got all the time in the world to do it. 

So the spirits, Cowhead and Horseface, [more about them next week!] bring in the souls for judgment, and King Yama opens the book of Life and Death [now you know where the Japanese got the idea of Deathnote] and sentences the dude/chick/human to whichever part of hell depending on how badly he’s sinned.

Some people say hell has ten courts with ten kings presiding over each one, but to the others, there are eighteen levels - whew! We don’t really know fo sho’. Anyway, no one really knows how hell is like - people just like making guesses and scaring themselves. Plus, it kind of gives us a kick in the butt to be good.

I mean, hell is really, well, hell! The demons in each court of hell torture you, like piercing your ribs, gouging your eyes out, making you kneel on various sharp objects, cutting your tongue, and so on. And you thought your teachers were sadists. But after you’ve suffered for long enough, you get to the wheel of reincarnation, where you will begin another life. You also gotta drink the wine/soup of Meng Po, [who is this old lady] to forget everything in your previous life. It also makes starting over a lot easier.

At least it’s more sanitary than the river Lethe.

So if you were a good human being, guess what? You get to be human again! Or if you were bad, you get turned into some pest like a fly or cockroach. Gross. That’s even more incentive to be good, I say.

Anyway, though the illustration makes Yama Chinese, he was actually Indian - he’s a Buddhist concept, see, and his likeness was translated for the Chinese people to make him a lot more accessible. I mean, we do create gods in our own image too, you know. Some people say that King Yama was the first man who died, and so he got to preside over the realm of the dead, but who knows?

His name also comes from Sanskrit, which means, “trussing up.” I sure don’t want to be trussed up by him, and neither do you.

Don’t be scared of him, though! He’s really cool - I mean, without him, all hell would break loose.

See what I did there?

1 week ago · 46 notes · Reblogged from fuckyeahchinesemyths

fuckyeahchinesemyths:

I had to write about this dude because I found this really kick-ass picture of him, and it’s a waste not to write about it. In olden days, people used to paste his picture in their homes, ‘cause it meant they’d live a really long time [Chinese people were big on this immortality thing] and protect them from disasters.
Actually, it’s a real good excuse to hang a photo of someone really kick-ass. I mean, he’s a demon slayer. Be afraid. Be terrified.
Anyway, people got to know about Zhong Kui through this Tang Emperor Xuanzong. And this emperor had really trippy dreams, ‘cause after he suffered from an attack of malaria while reviewing his troops, he dreamed for more than a month. He wrote about it and people didn’t think he was crazy, ‘cause Emperors were chosen by a mandate of heaven [kind of like a divine rule in Europe,] which meant that he had the divine powers to see stuff like that.
Oh yeah. Anyway, Xuanzong’s dream. So the Emperor dreamed of this man chasing after this demon, who’d stolen his favourite concubine’s perfume and his jade flute, and this demon slayer was so badass that he gouged out the eyes of the demon and ate him, omnomnom. And the emperor was all, “K, I’m grateful, but what just happened?”
And Zhong Kui was all, “Oh you know, I failed the imperial examination that selected military officers, and then I killed myself because I thought life sucked balls. But then I discovered there was no end to this thing so I was like, k, I’m gonna slay demons for you, Emperor.” The Emperor was like, cool. He woke up, got his artist to paint Zhong Kui, and told his people that they had to hang this awesome pic of the ghost tamer to drive away spirits and purify the atmosphere. [Chinese people were big on Feng Shui, too.]
In another story, our ghost tamer actually passed, but the bureaucrats discriminated against him ‘cause he was one ugly mug, so he killed himself and went to hell, complaining to the King, who I’ll feature later. King Yama was all, damn that’s unfair, so he consulted with his homie, the Jade Emperor in heaven. They made Zhong Kui a ghost tamer, ‘cause they knew he was awesome like that.
Anyway, his name is also homophonic with the Chinese character “zhui,” which was this thing they used to ward off ghosts and demons. 
Oh yeah. And the best bit?
This guy was SO kick-ass that people started naming their kids Zhong Kui, hoping that they’ll be able to do what he does. Not many gods in this pantheon can say that. Besides, isn’t it cool to hope that your son would become some bad-ass demon slaying warrior?

Time to feature my favourite ghostbuster, Zhong Kui!

fuckyeahchinesemyths:

I had to write about this dude because I found this really kick-ass picture of him, and it’s a waste not to write about it. In olden days, people used to paste his picture in their homes, ‘cause it meant they’d live a really long time [Chinese people were big on this immortality thing] and protect them from disasters.

Actually, it’s a real good excuse to hang a photo of someone really kick-ass. I mean, he’s a demon slayer. Be afraid. Be terrified.

Anyway, people got to know about Zhong Kui through this Tang Emperor Xuanzong. And this emperor had really trippy dreams, ‘cause after he suffered from an attack of malaria while reviewing his troops, he dreamed for more than a month. He wrote about it and people didn’t think he was crazy, ‘cause Emperors were chosen by a mandate of heaven [kind of like a divine rule in Europe,] which meant that he had the divine powers to see stuff like that.

Oh yeah. Anyway, Xuanzong’s dream. So the Emperor dreamed of this man chasing after this demon, who’d stolen his favourite concubine’s perfume and his jade flute, and this demon slayer was so badass that he gouged out the eyes of the demon and ate him, omnomnom. And the emperor was all, “K, I’m grateful, but what just happened?”

And Zhong Kui was all, “Oh you know, I failed the imperial examination that selected military officers, and then I killed myself because I thought life sucked balls. But then I discovered there was no end to this thing so I was like, k, I’m gonna slay demons for you, Emperor.” The Emperor was like, cool. He woke up, got his artist to paint Zhong Kui, and told his people that they had to hang this awesome pic of the ghost tamer to drive away spirits and purify the atmosphere. [Chinese people were big on Feng Shui, too.]

In another story, our ghost tamer actually passed, but the bureaucrats discriminated against him ‘cause he was one ugly mug, so he killed himself and went to hell, complaining to the King, who I’ll feature later. King Yama was all, damn that’s unfair, so he consulted with his homie, the Jade Emperor in heaven. They made Zhong Kui a ghost tamer, ‘cause they knew he was awesome like that.

Anyway, his name is also homophonic with the Chinese character “zhui,” which was this thing they used to ward off ghosts and demons. 

Oh yeah. And the best bit?

This guy was SO kick-ass that people started naming their kids Zhong Kui, hoping that they’ll be able to do what he does. Not many gods in this pantheon can say that. Besides, isn’t it cool to hope that your son would become some bad-ass demon slaying warrior?

Time to feature my favourite ghostbuster, Zhong Kui!

1 week ago · 54 notes · Reblogged from fuckyeahchinesemyths

1 week ago · 55 notes · Reblogged from fuckyeahchinesemyths

Journey to the Ten Courts and Eighteen Levels of Hell (II)

fuckyeahchinesemyths:

There’s this thing we Chinese peeps do - syncretism, which means putting together two different religions, like Taoism and Buddhism. It’s like, the version of hell has both religions because there are the Black and White Guard of Impermanence who has Taoist, and Cowhead and Horseface, who are Buddhist.

The Chinese version of hell is also based on this thang called karma, a concept we imported from India. Remember, there was this Buddhist monk called Xuanzang who went to collect the Buddhist scriptures in India to clear up all the confusion, so this probably influenced how the Chinese peeps thought about hell. (We also got a kick-ass book about it, too. It’s called Journey to the West.)

Anyway, before you read any further, you should know that this post is gonna be as graphic as fuck. And when I don’t censor the f word, you know this is serious business, so brace yourself. Before we go on further, I must also warn you of this:  

Read More

I swear I meant to reblog part one first and I have no idea what happened.

1 week ago · 98 notes · Reblogged from fuckyeahchinesemyths

medievalistsnet:

Mongols!
The Mongols in the West
Denis Sinor
Journal of Asian History: v.33 n.1 (1999)
The economic and social factors which made conflicts between China on the one hand and the pastoral empires of Mongolia on the other almost inevitable did not normally favor westward expansion. The Mongol conquest of western regions – including Iran and Eastern Europe – may be regarded as a by-product, as it were, of personal ambitions, of mistakes made by rulers of limited abilities, of armies left to their own devices to determine their course of action. In what follows, an attempt will be made to present the main features of Mongol history in the West with a minimum of digressions. This is a field which has been tilled over and over again by scholars good and bad, in voluminous books and short articles. It has been my feeling for a long time that a short, straightforward narrative may be needed, one that can be used for general orientation while, at the same, containing sufficient new material and views to warrant publication in a scholarly periodical. It will be up to the readers to judge whether either of these aims has been achieved here…

medievalistsnet:

Mongols!

The Mongols in the West

Denis Sinor

Journal of Asian History: v.33 n.1 (1999)

The economic and social factors which made conflicts between China on the one hand and the pastoral empires of Mongolia on the other almost inevitable did not normally favor westward expansion. The Mongol conquest of western regions – including Iran and Eastern Europe – may be regarded as a by-product, as it were, of personal ambitions, of mistakes made by rulers of limited abilities, of armies left to their own devices to determine their course of action. In what follows, an attempt will be made to present the main features of Mongol history in the West with a minimum of digressions. This is a field which has been tilled over and over again by scholars good and bad, in voluminous books and short articles. It has been my feeling for a long time that a short, straightforward narrative may be needed, one that can be used for general orientation while, at the same, containing sufficient new material and views to warrant publication in a scholarly periodical. It will be up to the readers to judge whether either of these aims has been achieved here…

1 week ago · 151 notes · Source · Reblogged from asianhistory